Briefing – Recycling centres in Edinburgh are reopening and special uplifts are resuming.

Below is a briefing from the Council on their plan to reopen recycling centres (by appointment only) from the 1st of June. Special uplifts will also resume.

Introduction
We’re reopening all our recycling centres from Monday 1 June on an appointment only basis and restarting the special uplift service.

These services were suspended in March due to staff shortages and physical distancing requirements but with enough crew members now available and physical distancing arrangements in place, recycling centres can reopen and special uplift collections can resume safely. However, note that there will be changes to the way in which they are managed.

Recycling centres
Recycling centres will reopen on an appointment only basis on Monday 1 June. Residents will need to book a time slot using a new online booking system on our website, which will be available from the afternoon of Thursday 28 May. Our contact centre staff are continuing to focus on emergency calls so it won’t be possible to book an appointment over the phone.

We’re expecting our sites to be busy and the booking system will help to minimise crowding and help staff and customers to maintain physical distancing.

Traffic management systems will be put in place at each location to help manage queues. This includes reverting to the old entrance at our Seafield recycling centre on Fillyside Road for the first three weeks. We’re writing to local residents who may be affected to advise them of this and the temporary local diversions and road closures which will be in place.

Traffic management signage will also be in place in streets around all sites as well as signs to ensure residents are aware that they must book an appointment to use a recycling centre.

Further guidance:

  • Only residents of Edinburgh can book an appointment. When doing so, they should consider:
    • if their visit is necessary
    • if they can store their waste safely at home.
  • They should be prepared to queue before entering the site.
  • Only cars are permitted – no vans or trailers.
  • Our staff won’t be able to help unload cars at the site, so people should plan to only bring what they can carry.
  • We may need to close our sites at short notice.
  • Anyone who turns up without a booking will be turned away.

Time slots are available on a first come, first served basis and anyone who turns up without a booking will be turned away.

Appointments are limited to one per household for the first two weeks of re-opening.

Special uplifts
We’re restarting our special uplift service on 1 June and will be accepting online bookings for the collection of bulky items from Thursday 28 May with a maximum of five items per household.

To ensure the safety of our crews and the public, we won’t be able to collect any items from inside homes.

The special uplift service is expected to be busy during the first few weeks, so there may be a wait for collections – please check the council website for updates.

Residents can book an uplift on our website though not currently over the phone – allowing our contact centre staff to deal with emergency calls. Special uplifts are charged at £5 per item and details of what we can and can’t collect will be available online.

We hope that resuming special uplifts will help alleviate pressure on recycling centres once they reopen.

Proposed 5G Mast next to the Chip Inn in Colinton Mains.

Cornerstone Telecommunications company owned by Vodafone Limited and Telefónica UK Limited, commonly known as O2, who manage a single grid network across the UK for these companies. Below is a briefing on their plan to install a 5G “radio base station” (mast) adjacent to the Chip Inn in Colinton Mains. Please get in touch if you have any concerns.

Briefing
This agreement allows both organisations to pool their basic network infrastructure, while running two, independent, nationwide networks. It maximises opportunities to consolidate the number of base stations and where possible can significantly reduce the environmental impact of network development.

5G rollout has begun and so Vodafone and Telefónica are in the process of upgrading their existing radio base stations in their single grid network wherever possible. As part of this continued network improvement program, there is a specific technical requirement to provide new 5G coverage in the entitled part of Edinburgh.

An existing Telefónica and Vodafone streetworks style base station has been identified in the area, however it cannot accommodate for both operators latest requirements. In order to fit into the operator’s single grid network, a new streetworks style base station is required for Vodafone’s service in close proximity of the existing streetworks style base station that will be retained and in due course upgraded for Telefónica’s service.

The purpose of this letter/email is to consult with you and seek your views on Cornerstone’s proposal before any planning submission is made. For your interest please find attached the Local Government Association’s guidance – A councillor’s guide to digital connectivity which discusses mobile infrastructure and 5G. Taking on board such matters, please find attached the draft plans of the proposal, in which we would appreciate any comments you may have at this stage.

We understand that you are not always able to provide site specific comments, however, Cornerstone and Vodafone are committed to consultation with communities on our mobile telecommunications proposals and as such would encourage you to respond.

Alternative site options considered and rejected are as detailed in the table below. Should you have any suggestions as to any other possible sites that you think would be worth looking into, then please reply and send as much detail as known.


1 Existing Streetworks – 44503o2 – 230, Oxgangs Road North, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh, EH13 9DY   
Although currently a shared structure providing 2G, 3G and 4G coverage for both operators, there is no comparable streetworks style solution that can accommodate 5G antennas for both Vodafone and Telefonica. It would require significant redevelopment and a completely new mast of substantial width and height, as well as taking up the majority of land at its base on Oxgangs Road North. Therefore it is considered that redevelopment would be inappropriate within the streetscene, compromise pedestrian movements and impact on highway safety.

2 Co-Location Co-Lo 44503o2 – 230, Oxgangs Road North, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh, EH13 9DY 
To avoid network interference there needs to be vertical and horizontal separation between masts. In this instance 16 metres of horizontal separation is required between the existing streetworks style mast that will continue to be operated by Telefonica and the proposed Vodafone mast. Therefore co-location within this 16 metre radius is not technically viable and so is discounted.

3 Rooftop – 237 Oxgangs Road North, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh, EH13 9JA 
This building was considered, however was determined to be too low to host a sensitively designed base station. When taking into account the roof shape, overall building height, as well as its surrounding context, a rooftop proposal of significant height would be required to meet the operator’s technical requirements. It is considered that such a proposal would be overly prominent and out of keeping with the host building.

4 Rooftop – 223 Oxgangs Road North, Colinton Mains Parish Church, EH13 9HB 
The property is a Grade B listed building in which given its status the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 emphasises that special regard should be had to the desirability of preserving listed buildings, their settings or any features of special architectural or historic interest. It is considered that a proposal on this listed building could compromise this heritage asset and so this option has not been pursued further.

5 Streetworks – Oxgangs Road North, Colinton Mains, Oxgangs, Edinburgh, EH13 9DY 
A street works style base station could not be deployed in this location as the mast and equipment cabinets would restrict the entrance to the nearby shops.

6 Streetworks – Pavement near, 227 Oxgangs Road North, Colinton Mains, Oxgangs, Edinburgh, EH13 9BW              
A street works style base station could not be deployed in this location as it would impact upon the visibility splays of those vehicles emerging from the nearby junction.

7 Streetworks – Oxgangs Road North, Edinburgh, EH13 9NE      
There is insufficient space available on this stretch of pavement as the siting and dimensions of a street works style base station would restrict pedestrian movements on Oxgangs Road to unacceptably low levels.

8 Greenfield – Oxgangs Common, Oxgangs Road North, Edinburgh, EH13 9NE   
This location is too far removed from the search area to provide the required level of coverage and capacity in which it would impact upon the neighbouring base station sites in the wider network. Therefore, this site has to be discounted as it does not meet the operator’s technical requirements.

9 Streetworks – Oxgangs Road North, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh, EH13 9DY       
There is insufficient space available on this stretch of pavement as the siting and dimensions of a street works style base station would restrict pedestrian movements to unacceptably low levels.

10 Greenfield – Colinton Mains Bowling Club and surrounding field, Oxgangs Road North, Edinburgh, EH13 9DY       
This site is found on the edge of the search area and given its geographical position would not provide meaningful coverage and capacity to the target area. Therefore, this site has to be discounted as it does not meet operator’s technical requirements. The proximity to the local school was also taken in to consideration.

11 Streetworks – Oxgangs Place/Gardens/Drive/Grove/Avenue/Drive, Edinburgh, EH13 9BE            
There are houses fronting both sides of this road on Oxgangs Place /  Gardens / Drive / Grove / Avenue / Drive, the pavements are narrow and there are regular driveways and pathways for some of the properties. Given the purely residential setting, we consider there are no opportunities to site a street works style proposal on this road as any proposal would compromise pedestrian movements, access arrangements to properties and would also likely impact on highway safety. In addition, the scale of this proposed installation would be out of keeping with the scale of this street.

12 Streetworks – Oxgangs Terrace/Collinton Mains Terrance/Grove/Road, Edinburgh, EH13 9BY    
There are houses fronting both sides of this road on Oxgangs Terrace/Collinton Mains Terrance/Grove/Road, the pavements are narrow and there are regular driveways and pathways for some of the properties. Given the purely residential setting, we consider there are no opportunities to site a street works style proposal on this road as any proposal would compromise pedestrian movements, access arrangements to properties and would also likely impact on highway safety. In addition, the scale of this proposed installation would be out of keeping with the scale of this street.

13 Streetworks – Colinton Mains Drive, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh, EH13 9BJ   
There are houses fronting both sides of this road Colinton Mains Drive, the pavements are narrow and there are regular driveways and pathways for some of the properties. Given the purely residential setting, we consider there are no opportunities to site a street works style proposal on this road as any proposal would compromise pedestrian movements, access arrangements to properties and would also likely impact on highway safety. In addition, the scale of this proposed installation would be out of keeping with the scale of this street.

14 Greenfield – Oxgangs Police Station, Oxgangs Road North, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh, EH13 9BW        
Given the height and maturity of the trees found next to this site, this natural clutter would prevent the effective propagation of radio signals towards the target area and so this location had to be discounted.

The Local Planning Authority mast register and our records of other potential sites have already been reviewed, the policies in the Development Plan have been taken into account and the planning history has been examined.

All Cornerstone installations are designed to be fully compliant with the public exposure guidelines established by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). These guidelines have the support of UK Government, the European Union and they also have the formal backing of the World Health Organisation. A certificate of ICNIRP compliance will be included within the planning submission.

As well as consulting with yourselves as the ward councillors, we are also seeking the views of the Local Planning Authority and the local MSP, Gordon MacDonald. We would be grateful if you could please advise of any local stakeholders or groups that you feel might like to make comments over and above those that you we have already identified.

Our usual consultation period for this type of development is 14 days, however we appreciate that at this time of year this may be difficult so, under these circumstances, we would still be happy to receive your comments out with that timeframe.

We look forward to receiving your comments on the preferred option identified and any alternatives options that you feel would be worth investigating.

Briefing – Code of conduct for busier off-road routes and parks

Below is a briefing from the Council on a citywide code of conduct campaign targeting busier off-road routes and parks. In my Ward applies to many places, but particularly the Water of Leith Walkway, Colinton Mains Park and Pentland Hills access points.

In addition to the advice below, people on bikes should use their bell when needed.

Briefing

We’re launching a campaign today (Friday 15 May), encouraging everyone to be considerate of other people and follow Scottish Government guidance when enjoying their outdoor exercise and travel.

Increase in people using off-road paths and parks

Since restrictions were introduced to help manage the coronavirus outbreak, there’s been an increase in people using the city’s network of paths, as well as parks, as part of their daily exercise and for travelling to work or local amenities – with up to five times their normal use.

Data up to week five of lockdown shows increases on the Union Canal towpath, with 17% growth in pedestrian numbers at Harrison Park, whilst cycling numbers have grown by 76% at Wester Hailes. On the North Edinburgh Path Network at Rodney St, pedestrian numbers have grown by 14%, cycling numbers by 32%.  At certain times of the week, especially weekends, much bigger increases have been recorded.

While it’s great that the routes are popular and well-used, we want to make sure that everyone can undertake and enjoy their daily exercise and travel in safety and comfort.

Paths for everyone code of conduct

We’re asking everyone to follow our Paths for Everyone code of conduct and to:

  • Consider other path users when enjoying exercise outdoors
  • Follow Scottish Government guidance on physical distancing
  • Give others space
  • When cycling, slow right down when overtaking
  • Stay local
  • Choose somewhere quieter or with wider paths, if you can
  • Try to avoid busy times – early evening or early morning tend to be quieter

About the campaign

We’re sharing guidance to help everyone walking, running, cycling, wheeling or walking their dogs to get the most out of daily outings while maintaining physical distancing safely.

To help spread the message, we’ll be issuing a press release and sharing posts on social media from Friday 15 May. From Monday 18 May will be installing signs with key advice in all parks and along some of the most popular routes.

Signs will cover the citywide network and include areas around the Union Canal towpath, the Water of Leith walkway, Portobello Promenade, the Innocent Railway path, the North Edinburgh Path Network, the Gilmerton to Roslin QuietRoute and Holyrood Park.

Report issues

There might be local issues that you are aware of where additional signs may help. Please email your suggestions to spacesforpeople@edinburgh.gov.uk

Briefing – Nike “ground-zero” Covid-19 Outbreak in Edinburgh

The Edinburgh Conference took the virus to Newcastle, but there is no doubt it helped spread it inside Edinburgh.

Below is a briefing from the Council’s Chief Executive on the Covid-19 outbreak which we now know took place in Edinburgh in February. This was kept from the public until the BBC reported it on Monday the 11th of May. I asked about the report on Tuesday and was told that the outbreak had been discussed in late February (this has now been retracted) and that Councillors on EIJB were told (they deny this). I was also led to understand the Council Leader was informed at the time, but it now transpires he was told “3 weeks after lockdown”.

Briefing
I agreed to provide the factual position with regard to the Reporting Scotland story regarding the Nike Conference last night from a City of Edinburgh Council perspective. In doing so I would flag that contact tracing of potential COVID-19 cases was conducted by the local Health Protection Team in NHS Lothian  as per the existing process.  Communication to Council Officers was via by the local Health Protection Team in NHS Lothian  to our Environmental Health Service as per established infectious disease outbreak procedures.  In terms of the facts:

  • The Nike Conference took place 26/27 Feb 2020.
  • Council EH teams were advised by local health protection team on 3 March that there was a ‘suspected case of COVID-19’ which was being investigated and that the Council would be updated when results were confirmed
  • There was then dialogue between the local Health Protection Team in NHS Lothian  and our Environmental Health Service whilst results were awaited. On the 6 Mar 2020 the case was confirmed. At this stage the Exec Director and Chief Exec were advised
  • On 6 Mar Chief Exec spoke to NHS Lothian to seek reassurance that CEC will be kept fully informed of the development of cases
  • EH confirmed with HPT that no assistance was required with further contact tracing and given the time lapse and that there was no intervention needed at hotel (the virus is believed to exist in the environment for no more than 72 hours and therefore by the time CEC was first alerted this phase had passed)
  • NHS Lothian were following up with other Health Boards regarding the situation including further tracing if required. The NHS were managing this incident including what information could be shared.

It should be noted that the Council stood up the Council Incident Management Team on the 27th February  to coordinate the Council’s response to the COIVD-19 crisis and I am confident that in this instance the Council responded in the appropriate manner.

Confirmed – Care Workers in Edinburgh are not getting the pay rise promised by the Scottish Government.

Below is a briefing from the Chief Officer of the Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership. It confirms that it has not been given the funds to meet the 3.3% pay rise pledge made by the Scottish Government – proof that headlines are cheap.

The Evening News deserves great credit for the work it has done in recent years to raise awareness of the social care crisis our capital has been facing. The pandemic has further highlighted, however, just how important social care workers are. Frankly, I think that it is incredible that it took a pandemic for the Scottish Government to offer care workers the living wage – it is the absolute minimum they deserve. The revelation that the service is so underfunded in Scotland’s capital that care workers won’t get the living wage like their counterparts elsewhere is an insult to care staff which should shame us all.

Update (7pm on 14th May 2020) – The Evening News has now spoken to the Scot Gov and Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership, and they have said:

“The Scottish Government has agreed to fund the additional costs required to meet this commitment. We are working closely with Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership on delivering the payments and have every expectation that these hard working social care staff will be paid at least the new Real Living Wage of £9.30 backdated to 1 April.”

The Scottish Government

We recognise the importance of compensating health and social care workers suitably for the key roles they undertake. Planning is well underway to implement the 3.3% salary uplift outlined by the Scottish Government in April and we have been working closely with them to finalise the funding arrangements which underpin this commitment.”

Edinburgh Health and Social Care Partnership

I am hopeful that as well as funding the pay rise, the Scottish Government will now fully fund social care provision in Edinburgh.

Briefing
Many of our providers have been in touch asking what our plans are for implementing the Cabinet Secretary’s commitment to fair work and the living wage in adult social care by agreeing a national contractual uplift of 3.3%.  As soon as the announcement was made, my team contacted the Scottish Government and we have been working closely with them to finalise the funding arrangements which underpin this commitment. 

Here, in Edinburgh, we are extremely conscious of the contribution all heath and social care staff make towards keeping vulnerable people in our city safe and this is more true now than ever.  Every day my team and I hear heart-warming examples of the extra mile colleagues in this extended workforce are going to to support people in the most testing circumstances.  We therefore recognise the importance of enabling providers to maintain a fair working regime to suitably recompense workers for the key roles they are undertaking.

This desire, however, needs to be set against the financial challenges facing the public sector in Scotland and the rising costs of all services which regularly outstrip the income we receive.  For 20/21 we are facing an opening budgetary gap of c£24m and, as yet, have not fully identified how we will meet this.  As such, it would be extremely difficult for us to increase this funding gap, which is why agreeing funding with the Scottish Government is so crucial for us.  Our calculations show that we would need around a  further £5m to fund an across the board increase of 3.3% on all our contracts so I’m sure you will understand our need for assurance. 

As soon as we get confirmation from colleagues in the Government we will move quickly to implement.

A mandate for safer travel for all in Colinton, Oxgangs & Fairmilehead

Introduction
The Scottish Government have given Councils £10m to improve travel safety during the Covid-19 crisis and in the recovery phase. In addition to this, the UK Government has launched £2bn fund which will also support safer travel. These investments are really to solve two problems:

  1. Lots of people have embraced healthier lifestyles – more walking, jogging and cycling. However, footpaths are often too congested for people to keep a safe distance from others when walking and many cyclists are finding the roads unsafe.
  2. As the lockdown lifts, it appears unlikely (in the short term at least) that people will go back to using the bus as they did before. The Council therefore wants to make the city safer to walk and cycle.

The City of Edinburgh has received some criticism for failing to consult on how this money is being spent. This blog is about how I have consulted people in my Ward on the way forward.

Although the Council has done nothing in my ward yet to make walking and cycling safer, I have received many ideas from local residents for making travel easier for everyone. In short, these focus on making residential areas safer and improving safety for cyclists on key arterial routes through (and into) my Ward. Rather than take the proposals straight to the Council I wanted to give people a chance to rate the ideas and make further suggestions of their own. This is important as, hopefully, it will make the Council more likely to take the proposals seriously.

The Survey
I complied a survey of all the ideas on Google Forms and issued it on my Blog and via my mailing list at around 8pm on Tuesday (5th of May). I did not share the blog post until 8pm on Wednesday (via Twitter – see below). I posted it on my Facebook page at around 8pm on Thursday.

Releasing the survey on this phased way meant that if it was somehow hijacked on social media, I would know the first 24 hours would not be impacted. The responses were as follows: Day 1 – 179, Day 2 – 63 and Day 3 – 50.

The people responding to the survey were encouraged to give their postcode and 175 did so. When plotted, it can be seen that the vast majority of the respondents live in my Ward.

Let me be clear, I think this is the most authoritative survey of the public in Edinburgh on how we improve safety on our footpaths and roads within the context of the Covid-19 crisis.

Results
The survey focused on three key issues:

  1. Safer streets for residents – blocking rat runs.
  2. Extra protection for cyclists on key routes.
  3. Reviews of parking in key areas

Safer streets for residents – The focus of these proposals was making it safer for people in residential areas to move around by stopping drivers cutting through the area. People were asked if is this was a “Good Idea”, “Bad Idea” or if they were “Unsure”.

The results showed that there was overwhelming support for stopping vehicles using Oxgangs Road North as a local shortcut. When unsure responses were removed, there was also clear support for addressing the other local rat-runs.

Extra protection for cyclists on key routes – The focus of these proposals was making it safer for people using bikes to commute to elsewhere in the city. Again people were asked if is this was a “Good Idea”, “Bad Idea” or if they were “Unsure”.

The results showed that there was overwhelming support for improving routes for people on bikes. Even with “Unsure” responses included, there was a clear desire for cycle lanes to be introduced on key routes.

This question also asked if there was support for immediately reducing the speed limit on all 40mph roads in my Ward to 30mph – the response was clear.

Reviews of parking in key areas – The focus of these proposals was dealing with parking problems – those generated by the crisis (e.g. people driving to beauty spots to take exercise), and planning for the recovery phase.

The results showed that there was overwhelming support for reviewing parking around all schools in my Ward to ensure social distancing can be maintained when they reopen, with 95% of people backing the measure.

Support for reviewing parking elsewhere, however, was dominated by uncertainty. Nonetheless, when “Unsure” responses were removed, there was a clear majority in favour of dealing with some of the problems these communities are facing.

Crossing Points – I also took the opportunity to ask if there were any road crossing points where it may be difficult for pedestrians to maintain social distancing. The word-cloud diagram below shows the responses, but crossing points in Colinton Village were mentioned by 18 people, with one saying:

Colinton Village Pedestrians crossing outside Coop supermarket: path width either side is 1.5m, and southern footpath is not suitable for physical distancing. Worse, the guardrail steals up extra space, pushing pedestrians into live traffic.

Colinton resident

Many others raised Fairmilehead crossroads:

The Fairmilehead crossroads (where the A702 meets the B701) is terrible for pedestrians. The metal barriers make distancing really difficult, and the lights are very unfriendly to pedestrians. It really needs an “all-cross” mode in the sequence. A lot of people cross on red,, but vehicles can travel fast around the bend.

Fairmilehead resident

A number also raised Oxgangs Avenue:

The end of Oxgangs Ave leading onto Oxgangs Road North. The island for pedestrians is very close to where cars are trying to turn – often groups of school children trying to cross at the same time.

Oxgangs resident

Narrow Footpaths – The last question asked people to identify areas where the footpath is simply too narrow. The word-cloud diagram shows the responses, but Braid Road (just outside my Ward!) was mentioned 20 times. The narrow footpath at the crest of Braid Road was a common concern:

Brow of hill on braid road – pedestrians always having to walk in the road and can’t be seen by cars and pedestrians can’t see cars either. Lots of families walking that route to access braid hills entrance there.

Buckstone resident

Others raised concerns about the Walkway beside the Braid Burn:

The path along the Braid Burn from Oxgangs Road North up to Colinton Mains Road, continuing up to Redford Road alongside the care home is narrow and fenced in by flood management defences so not currently a usable alternative to the road if trying to socially distance.

Colinton Mains resident

Woodhall Road was mentioned by 11 people:

Woodhall Road after Bonaly Road. Several times I have seen children having to go onto the road to allow people past who have chosen the ‘wall’ side, with traffic travelling well over the 20mph limit.

Colinton resident

The width of footpaths in Colinton Village was also a concern:

Almost all footpaths are not wide enough to maintain social distancing. Key trip generators and busy roads need to be prioritised. Significant areas that draw in people that are inadequately supported is Colinton Village centre ( this public realm and provision for access by non motorised users is already poor and does not cater well for those with protected charteristics and any area where services are positioned by carriageway.

Colinton resident

Conclusion
With almost 300 people completing the survey over a three day period, the the results offer the most credible understanding of the extent to which the community wants the Council to take action to improve everyone’s safety in my Ward. The survey gives the Council the mandate to develop a six point plan to:

  1. Reduce rat-running in residential ares;
  2. Improve cycle safety on key routes;
  3. Review parking in key hotspots;
  4. Cut 40mph speed limits to 30mph;
  5. Bring forward measures to enable social distancing at key crossing points; and,
  6. Review locations where the footpaths are not wide enough for pedestrians to safely pass each other.

What Next?
I shall be forwarding this blog to the Council and request a formal response. In the interim, if you have not done so already, please complete my survey.

Cllr Scott Arthur, 9th of May 2020

A Survey – Safer Travel for all in Colinton, Oxgangs & Fairmilehead

The Scottish Government have given Councils £10m to improve travel safety during the Covid-19 crisis and in the recovery phase. This is really to solve two problems:

  1. Lots of people have embraced healthier lifestyles – more walking, jogging and cycling. However, footpaths are often too congested for people to keep a safe distance from others when walking and many cyclists are finding the roads unsafe.
  2. As the lockdown lifts, it appears unlikely (in the short term at least) that people will go back to using the bus as they did before. The Council therefore wants to make the city safer to walk and cycle.

I have received some ideas from local residents for making travel around my Ward safer for everyone. In short, these focus on making residential areas safer and improving safety for cyclists on key arterial routs through (and into) my Ward. Before I speak to the Council about this, I wanted to give people a chance to rate the ideas and make further suggestions of their own via this survey. 

You can find the survey here.